Effect of oregano essential oil and carvacrol on Cryptosporidium parvum infectivity in HCT-8 cells.

antimicrobial, fungi

Effect of oregano essential oil and carvacrol on Cryptosporidium parvum infectivity in HCT-8 cells.

Author Information

Gaur S1, Kuhlenschmidt TB2, Kuhlenschmidt MS3, Andrade JE4.

1 Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA.
1 Department of Pathobiology, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA.
1 Department of Pathobiology, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA; Division of Nutritional Sciences, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA.
1 Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA; Division of Nutritional Sciences, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA.

Abstract

Cryptosporidium parvum is the second leading cause of persistent diarrhea among children in low-resource settings. This study examined the effect of oregano essential oil (OEO) and carvacrol (CV) on inhibition of C. parvum infectivity in vitro. HCT-8 cells were seeded (1×106) in 96-well microtiter plates until confluency. Cell viability and infectivity were assessed by seeding HCT-8 cell monolayers with C. parvum oocysts (1×104) in two modalities: 1) 4h co-culture with bioactive (0-250μg/mL) followed by washing and incubation (48h, 37°C, 5% CO2) in bioactive-free media; and 2) 4h co-culture of C. parvum oocysts followed by washing and treatment with bioactive (0-250μg/mL) during 48-h incubation. Cell viability was tested using Live/Dead™ assay whereas infectivity was measured using C. parvum-specific antibody staining via immunofluorescence detection. Loss of cell viability was observed starting at 125μg/mL and 60μg/mL for OEO and CV, respectively. Neither OEO nor CV modulated the invasion of C. parvum sporozoites in HCT-8 cells. Treatment with bioactive after invasion reduced relative C. parvum infectivity in a dose-dependent manner to 55.6±10.4% and 45.8±4.1% at 60 and 30μg/mL of OEO and CV, respectively. OEO and CV are potential bioactives to counteract C. parvum infection in children.

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